Home Review Western Systems and Yunex Traffic partnership will optimize traffic management in California

Western Systems and Yunex Traffic partnership will optimize traffic management in California

Western Systems is partnering with Yunex Traffic and the City of Monterey, California, to expand their SCOOT (Split Cycle Offset Optimization Technique) adaptive traffic control system to more corridors within the city.

SCOOT models the traffic detected on the street to continuously adapt three key traffic control parameters: the amount of green for each approach, the time between adjacent signals, and the time allocated for all approaches to a signalized intersection. As a result, the signal timing evolves with the changing traffic volumes and demands.

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Several years ago, Western Systems worked with Monterey on their first implementation of SCOOT at intersections along Lighthouse, Del Monte and the North Freemont corridors. Since its implementation, traffic has significantly improved. The before and after study on Lighthouse Avenue showed:

  • Travel time decreased an average of 10%
  • Average delay decreased by 30%
  • Average stops decreased by 32%
  • Average vehicle speed increased by 13%

After the success of the first implementation, the City will be adding SCOOT to additional intersections along the Munras, Foam, Pacific and Franklin corridors. These corridors experience high traffic volumes and unpredictable peaks, which leads to inefficient traffic and increased vehicle emissions.

“Western Systems is excited to once again partner with the City of Monterey to implement SCOOT,” says Zach Hoiting, sales manager, Western Systems. “SCOOT’s dynamic and real-time method of signal control has been proven to minimize traffic delays and stops while decreasing vehicle emissions for the city.”

“By adding the remaining corridors to the existing SCOOT network of intersections, the city will have all arterials operating based on real-time roadway demands,” adds Andrea Renny, P.E., PTOE, city traffic engineer, City of Monterey. “As a popular tourist destination, our traffic can be unpredictable and have significant variations that are difficult to address using traditional time of day signal timing methods. With all main corridors running SCOOT, the city will have less stop and go traffic, improved travel times and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.”

Western systems will be providing design and engineering services, products, and installation support for this project, set to kick off later this summer. In addition to the SCOOT product, Western Systems will be providing new Stretch M traffic signal cabinets and M60 Yunex controllers.

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